Member / Customer Satisfaction - how do you measure it?

Service: Hoop.la

Member / Customer Satisfaction - how do you measure it?

Service: Hoop.la
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I'm tagging in @neil@GidgetKat and @jstevens because I think you guys might have some insights for ST.

I've seen some articles talking about the benefit of randomly phone interviewing some segment of the members on a quarterly basis.

A high number of visits over time seems to be a pretty good indicator of value for lurkers, since something is drawing them back (even if they aren't posting).

I'll be interested to hear what additional thoughts pop up here!

Its a challenging question. 

In my 16 years of forum managing experience... some people are very supportive and appreciative, but won't post and don't visit often. While some who use our site a lot -view it as just another anonymous resource they take advantage of. 

We are a largely a resource site, not a 'hobby' or chit-chat community site, and I think that makes a big difference. A hobby board like Melvin's OGR  railroader hobbyist hoopla site at https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/category/train-forums seems to be much more fraternal.

One of the things we occasionally do is invite people to tell us why they like our site. We're running a promotion like that right now and giving away free can koozies. The level of personal appreciation they share always tells us something.

We have been working on personalizing our site, giving it a more "human" face -with the theory that people don't relate as well to impersonal sites. 

We've been increasing our Facebook activity as well, as people seem more willing to click "like" there, than on our resource forums. "Like" on our board is not used very much.

As far as analytics go, we do pay attention to them, but time spend and # of forums clicked don't necessarily tell you much about their "satisfaction."  

 

@Rosemary O'Neill  --Maybe one of those "Did You Find This Topic Helpful?" feedback links would be a helpful feature. 

We measure interest by comments, blog posts, number of people who subscribe to a daily digest and weekly roundup that we send out via MailChimp (and then analyze our open rate), number of people on the network. Almost all content is available to the public, so we don't pay too much attention to people who are signed in. They're usually signed in because they're engaging in some way -- private messaging, commenting, liking, posting.

We also have groups on ACEs Connection that support local ACEs initiatives in cities, counties and states, and we are about to roll out a new set of guidelines and apps that help their work, so we'll be looking at how many more community initiatives sign up.

We've nearly doubled in size every years, and I'm happy with that, or even slowing it down a bit. We want to make sure that almost everyone who joins is getting most of what they expect and need.

Cheers, Jane

We use all those methods!

We field a constituent survey periodically (about annually). This asks about many areas, but includes whether they know about and use our community. We break out different aspects of it as well. This survey gets deployed through our eNewsletter, social channels, etc. We also do smaller surveys as well that ask what people want.

We also monitor our activity and engagement. We look at highly active members, lurkers who log in regularly even if they don't post, etc.

Hi, @neil

Thanks for your comments and insights.

I'd like to look at your site and get a feel for what happens there. Would that be okay?

neil posted:

Its a challenging question. 

In my 16 years of forum managing experience... some people are very supportive and appreciative, but won't post and don't visit often. While some who use our site a lot -view it as just another anonymous resource they take advantage of. 

I hope we're the doing the same great service to our members.

We are a largely a resource site, not a 'hobby' or chit-chat community site, and I think that makes a big difference.

We have become more of a resource site than we used to be. I miss the greater sense of community we once had. But I can't know one way of the other, if people are just as satisfied as I once believed they were. These days, the chit-chat goes to Facebook.  One thing for sure... replies in our community are not the sound-bytes we get in our Facebook pages and groups. I think the higher threshold leads to more thoughtful and lengthier replies. But those replies are much less frequent.

A hobby board like Melvin's OGR  railroader hobbyist hoopla site at https://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/category/train-forums seems to be much more fraternal.

Our community members are musicians, DJs, and other performers who rely on our products to be heard by their audiences.  At one time we were a Community of Practice. 

Today we're more of a place where people ask product related questions and most of the time, they get answers. And then they move on.

I'd like to believe they are are satisfied by the experience, but I can't take that for granted.

One of the things we occasionally do is invite people to tell us why they like our site. We're running a promotion like that right now and giving away free can koozies. The level of personal appreciation they share always tells us something.

I just learned what a koozie is.

 

We have been working on personalizing our site, giving it a more "human" face -with the theory that people don't relate as well to impersonal sites. 

That's why I'd like to take a look.

 

We've been increasing our Facebook activity as well, as people seem more willing to click "like" there, than on our resource forums. "Like" on our board is not used very much.

Do you find it's a zero-sum situation with Facebook?

 

As far as analytics go, we do pay attention to them, but time spend and # of forums clicked don't necessarily tell you much about their "satisfaction."  

@Rosemary O'Neill  --Maybe one of those "Did You Find This Topic Helpful?" feedback links would be a helpful feature

 Image result for thumbs up icon

Thanks, Neil.

ST

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The bigger, better, and more complex we got, the more I think people become reticent to post. Perhaps it happens when people find what they need without having to post questions?  

On promotions, the race is not to the swift or big, IMO. It's a long game.  

One of our issues with premium numbers is turnover. Our typical supporting member teacher is a volunteer who lasts a year or two, then stops teaching. 

BTW: Been to your site. First impression: I'm in over my head. 

Hi, Jane,

Thank you for taking the time to write.

If you had to describe your community in a couple of sentences, what would you say?

jstevens posted:

We measure interest by comments, blog posts, number of people who subscribe to a daily digest and weekly roundup that we send out via MailChimp (and then analyze our open rate), number of people on the network.

That must take commitment to prepare the weekly roundup.  Using MailChimp analytics looks like a great way to gauge interest. Thanks for the idea. 

Almost all content is available to the public, so we don't pay too much attention to people who are signed in. They're usually signed in because they're engaging in some way -- private messaging, commenting, liking, posting.

One of our communities is like yours in this respect. We have another community that's a walled garden.  I'm primarily concerned with customer satisfaction for the public community.

We also have groups on ACEs Connection that support local ACEs initiatives in cities, counties and states, and we are about to roll out a new set of guidelines and apps that help their work, so we'll be looking at how many more community initiatives sign up.

Aaaah. This puts things in perspective.

We've nearly doubled in size every years,

That's great, Jane.

and I'm happy with that, or even slowing it down a bit. We want to make sure that almost everyone who joins is getting most of what they expect and need.

Cheers, Jane

Thank you.

ST

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